2 Billionth Salmon caught in Bristol Bay

Since the beginning of the Bristol Bay canned salmon industry in 1884, its fishermen have landed 1.99 billion salmon. Any moment, a commercial fisherman in Alaska will land the 2 billionth salmon caught in Bristol Bay’s 133-year commercial fishing history.

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The 1 billionth salmon was caught on the afternoon of June 28, 1978 in the Nushagak River district.

The total is currently sitting at 1,999,073,578, which leaves 926,422 salmon to go in order to reach the magic number of 2 billion.

This will most likely happen this afternoon, because with less than 1 million salmon remaining- in the last four days fisherman have harvested more than 1 million per day.

Confirmation will come with the updating of today’s catch at the following link.

Another Non-Profit “Environmental” Group

Captain Artie Price holds the record for the largest recorded Tarpon caught, weighed, & released in Boca Grande, Florida.

Save the Tarpon, who has been in a legal battle with the Professional Tarpon Tournament Series, has waged a social media war against Captain Price because of this video, which depicts the guide holding a tarpon as it is eaten by a group of sharks.

The video shows Captain Price trying to revive a tired tarpon that has just been caught by a client, and is currently under investigation by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission.

With apparently 15-20 sharks in the water, the exhausted tarpon surely would have been eaten upon immediate release. The ironic thing is that Save the Tarpon lobbied specifically for law 68B-32.004 Restriction on Possession of Tarpon which handcuffed Captain Price from being able to successfully release the tarpon.

Continue reading “Another Non-Profit “Environmental” Group”

Sicmanta

“Don’t confuse me with being anything else other than proud. Proud to be a hunter. It’s time we stop apologizing for how we get our protein. This is who we are. Unless you’re a small time rancher, small time farmer, a hunter or fishermen… you really have no idea where your food comes from. Most people don’t even think about it. Well, we think about it.”

Donnie Vincent

Jose Wejebe

Jose Wejebe was born in Havan Cuba in 1958 during Castro’s communist revolution. Jose’s father was imprisoned for speaking out against the Castro regime, and after losing everything to the Cuban government, the Wejebe family was able to make it to America.

At a young age Wejebe became obsessed with exploring under the sea. He got a job at an aquarium, and learned how to fly fish, and started guiding by age 18.

Wejebe worked for decades as a guide, predominantly in Southern Florida, eventually landing his own TV show, The Spanish Fly.

Jose was charitable, working with Make a Wish Foundation, Big Brothers and Big Sister, Cystic Fibrosis, and Hooked on a Cure.

I was lucky to meet Jose at a fishing expo during high school. He was just as I had perceived him on TV, obsessed with fishing, and loved learning from others who are too.

On April 6, 2012, 3 hours after catching this tarpon, Wejebe was killed flying his single engine plane. There is now a charity set up in his name, the Jose Wejebe Memorial Foundation.

He was the greatest steward the sport of fishing has ever seen.

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